A Summer day in Salzburg with Champagne and Parties
A Summer day in Salzburg with Champagne and Parties
July 24, 2012 by admin

Salzburg, surrounded by lakes and rolling green hills, is a delicious European Summer alternative if you’re looking to experience renowned baroque architecture mixed with gourmet food and world class music. Salzburg, the fourth largest city in Austria is also the birthplace of prolific music composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Writers Max and Jennie Suich gave us their impression of Salzburg in the summer, just in case you want to visit.

Salzburg’s Altstadt (the Old Town), all charming baroque icing, dimples, curls and spires, was spared the terrible bombing that Dresden, Berlin and other great German cities experienced during World War II, though the city’s key infrastructure like railway junctions and bridges were destroyed and the dome of its beautiful cathedral collapsed.

Now the dome is repaired, the city is a World Heritage site, worth the visit alone for a stroll through this living piece of history. And at the height of the summer, in late July and August, this Austrian city, birthplace of Mozart, becomes a haven for music, drama and the singer’s art at the Summer Salzburg Festival. This year the festival promises something special: two appearances by the brilliant Russian soprano Anna Nebretko. The three Mozart/Da Ponte operas, Figaro, Cosi fan tutte and Don Giovanni, produced amidst considerable controversy over the past three years by Claus Guth will, for the first time, all be performed in a single season this year.

Simon Rattle brings his hair and the Berlin Phil to give Mahler’s Seventh, and Daniel Barenboim brings the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, the extraordinary youth orchestra comprised of young Arab and Israeli musicians (brought together originally by Barenboim and Edward Said in 1999 to provide a symbol of cultural union across the bitter religious and national barriers of the Middle East), to play Mahler and Beethoven.

Opera stars and great conductors come for the festival but so too do the glitterati and the celebrities, the A-list rich from New York and LA, Cleveland, and Boston, London, Paris, Berlin and Vienna exhibiting, not uncommonly, trophy wives and toy boys. This is a great opportunity for amusing people-watching, ideally from the first floor terrace of the main theatre, glass in hand, as the crowd mills-to-be-seen below. At interval amidst the beauty of the old city and the glory of the music on a beautiful summer night there are the champagne tents outside (disconcertingly under umbrellas promoting major sponsor Nestle’s Nespresso) to observe the passagiato, Salzburg style. Or if, like so many German visitors, black tie or not, beer and sausage is your go, that’s just around the corner.

You too might dress up and go with the flow though it is not absolutely necessary, despite the firm suggestion from Gerbert Schwaighofer. “If you go skiing, you take your skis? Of course! If you come to the Salzburg Festival, then you bring your black tie. You will see at least half of the audience here in formal evening wear.” These words of advice come from the financial – not the fashion – arbiter of the Salzburg Festival. Schwaighofer was the festival’s finance director for 10 years, retiring in December.

But Salzburg is loosening up. From our personal observation, at the first nights of major opera performances, fewer than half the patrons were in formal wear. At other performances much less than half. That’s what makes Salzburg fun. If you want to dress up, then you can.

So there’s more to the festival than just high society. But without the snob effect many of the sponsors and donors of millions of dollars of capital funds would not be so generous and Salzburg’s festival would be much more expensive or, more likely, history.

If you’re thinking to visit Salzburg, contact your luxury concierge Pure Conciergerie to help arrange your travel packages, accommodations, opera tickets as well as personal guided visits.

Pure Entertainment Group suggestion on the best 5 luxury hotels in Salzburg:

– Hotel Sacher Salzburg
– Hotel Goldener Hirsch
– Hotel Schloss Monchstein
– Radisson Blu Hotel Altstadt
– Arthotel Blaue Gans

Pure Entertainment Group
Written in Luxury Travel Magazine Australia

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A Summer day in Salzburg with Champagne and Parties
July 24, 2012 by admin

Salzburg, surrounded by lakes and rolling green hills, is a delicious European Summer alternative if you’re looking to experience renowned baroque architecture mixed with gourmet food and world class music. Salzburg, the fourth largest city in Austria is also the birthplace of prolific music composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Writers Max and Jennie Suich gave us their impression of Salzburg in the summer, just in case you want to visit.

Salzburg’s Altstadt (the Old Town), all charming baroque icing, dimples, curls and spires, was spared the terrible bombing that Dresden, Berlin and other great German cities experienced during World War II, though the city’s key infrastructure like railway junctions and bridges were destroyed and the dome of its beautiful cathedral collapsed.

Now the dome is repaired, the city is a World Heritage site, worth the visit alone for a stroll through this living piece of history. And at the height of the summer, in late July and August, this Austrian city, birthplace of Mozart, becomes a haven for music, drama and the singer’s art at the Summer Salzburg Festival. This year the festival promises something special: two appearances by the brilliant Russian soprano Anna Nebretko. The three Mozart/Da Ponte operas, Figaro, Cosi fan tutte and Don Giovanni, produced amidst considerable controversy over the past three years by Claus Guth will, for the first time, all be performed in a single season this year.

Simon Rattle brings his hair and the Berlin Phil to give Mahler’s Seventh, and Daniel Barenboim brings the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, the extraordinary youth orchestra comprised of young Arab and Israeli musicians (brought together originally by Barenboim and Edward Said in 1999 to provide a symbol of cultural union across the bitter religious and national barriers of the Middle East), to play Mahler and Beethoven.

Opera stars and great conductors come for the festival but so too do the glitterati and the celebrities, the A-list rich from New York and LA, Cleveland, and Boston, London, Paris, Berlin and Vienna exhibiting, not uncommonly, trophy wives and toy boys. This is a great opportunity for amusing people-watching, ideally from the first floor terrace of the main theatre, glass in hand, as the crowd mills-to-be-seen below. At interval amidst the beauty of the old city and the glory of the music on a beautiful summer night there are the champagne tents outside (disconcertingly under umbrellas promoting major sponsor Nestle’s Nespresso) to observe the passagiato, Salzburg style. Or if, like so many German visitors, black tie or not, beer and sausage is your go, that’s just around the corner.

You too might dress up and go with the flow though it is not absolutely necessary, despite the firm suggestion from Gerbert Schwaighofer. “If you go skiing, you take your skis? Of course! If you come to the Salzburg Festival, then you bring your black tie. You will see at least half of the audience here in formal evening wear.” These words of advice come from the financial – not the fashion – arbiter of the Salzburg Festival. Schwaighofer was the festival’s finance director for 10 years, retiring in December.

But Salzburg is loosening up. From our personal observation, at the first nights of major opera performances, fewer than half the patrons were in formal wear. At other performances much less than half. That’s what makes Salzburg fun. If you want to dress up, then you can.

So there’s more to the festival than just high society. But without the snob effect many of the sponsors and donors of millions of dollars of capital funds would not be so generous and Salzburg’s festival would be much more expensive or, more likely, history.

If you’re thinking to visit Salzburg, contact your luxury concierge Pure Conciergerie to help arrange your travel packages, accommodations, opera tickets as well as personal guided visits.

Pure Entertainment Group suggestion on the best 5 luxury hotels in Salzburg:

– Hotel Sacher Salzburg
– Hotel Goldener Hirsch
– Hotel Schloss Monchstein
– Radisson Blu Hotel Altstadt
– Arthotel Blaue Gans

Pure Entertainment Group
Written in Luxury Travel Magazine Australia

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Seasrch

Subscribe to the newsletter

Inspiration

VIEW MORE

Archives

A-list celebrities accessories architecture art beach bespoke experiences booking champagne chic cocktails concierge service Contemporary design designer entertainment event expensive fashion fine dining fine spirit food France gift gourmet honeymoon honeymoon destinations hospitality italy leather goods lifestyle luxury luxury concierge luxury hotel luxury interior luxury rooms mode package Pure Entertainment Group reservation restaurant shopping tours travel wine womenswear